Posted by: syorkestern | February 13, 2013

Underwater Coiba

Both Filippa and I are very happy to to take water over our heads at times. Being so close to a first rate diving spot like Coiba, we could hardly avoid to put on the flippers and join the fish!

White tip reef shark - very common here, we saw over 20 during the dives

White tip reef shark – very common here, we saw over 20 during the dives

Flag Cabrilla - every crevice contains at least one here.

Flag Cabrilla – every crevice contains at least one here.

Bumphead Triggerfish, Pseudobalistes naufragium

Bumphead Triggerfish, Pseudobalistes naufragium – biult like a tank.

Amberjack - one of these came in in the end of the dive, scaring away a school of jacks.

Amberjack – one of these came in in the end of the dive, scaring away a school of jacks.

spadefish

Pacific Spadefish

Langustine

Langustine

All geared up with Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus

Filippa and Martin – all geared up with Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus

Mexican Hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia

Mexican Hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia

All the fish in the pictures here were seen during a single dive, and often in abundance. Schools of thousands of Bigeye Jack, Greybar Grunts and Snappers. Most of the pics are not ours, while we did play around with a UV camera during the first day and got some decent shots.

Giant damselfish

Leather Jack

Chevron Barracuda - you don´t see Great Barracuda here like in the Caribbean, but these slightly smaller relatives come in large groups.

Chevron Barracuda – you don´t see Great Barracuda here like in the Caribbean, but these slightly smaller relatives come in large groups.

Fine spotted moray - one of the ones we saw at this site was a huge, almost two meters long, specimen.

Fine spotted moray – one of the ones we saw at this site was a huge, almost two meters long, specimen.

Greybar Grunts

Greybar Grunts

Golden Trevally - saw this species in three age stages this week - juveniles, intermediate and adults.

Golden Trevally – saw this species in three age stages this week – juveniles, intermediate and adults.

Panemic Green Moray Eel - most common of the morays around Coiba

Panemic Green Moray Eel – most common of the morays around Coiba

Even if the Whale Shark eluded us again, Coiba diving did not disappoint us!

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Responses

  1. The whale shark only eluded us for a few more days, as I joined a day trip to Coiba and got the pleasure to enjoy the company of the worlds largest non-whale animal for a couple of minutes. Filippa was unfortunatelly not there, so she still has this to look forward to..


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